NEW YORK (AP) - McDonald's customers stopping in for a Big Mac on the eve of Tax Day may be greeted by demonstrators calling for pay of $15 an hour and a union.

NEW YORK (AP) McDonald's customers stopping in for a Big Mac on the eve of Tax Day may be greeted by demonstrators calling for pay of $15 an hour and a union.

Labor organizers say they're planning another day of protests at McDonald's stores in dozens of cities on April 14, similar to last year.

The move is intended to build on a campaign to lift wages and revitalize union enrollment by spotlighting working conditions at the world's biggest hamburger chain. Already, a wave of demonstrations that began in New York City in late 2012 has made low pay a major political issue and helped spur the passage of higher local minimum wages nationwide.

A McDonald's Corp. spokeswoman said restaurants will remain open and "focus on providing an exceptional experience for our customers."