LONDON (AP) - British Prime Minister David Cameron was meeting Saturday with senior Cabinet advisers to seek support for a new deal that would govern Britain's relations with the European Union - a move that comes ahead of a U.K. referendum on EU membership that could be held as early as this summer.

LONDON (AP) British Prime Minister David Cameron was meeting Saturday with senior Cabinet advisers to seek support for a new deal that would govern Britain's relations with the European Union a move that comes ahead of a U.K. referendum on EU membership that could be held as early as this summer.

Cameron may announce a referendum date after the meeting, the first Cabinet session held on a Saturday since the Falklands War in 1982.

The deal with the EU was reached Friday in Brussels at a summit of the 28-nation bloc's leaders. After it was announced, Cameron said he would campaign "heart and soul" for a "yes" vote in favor of Britain remaining within the EU.

Cameron says he has achieved the concessions he sought from other leaders. Still, he faces skepticism within his own Conservative Party about the merits of retaining Britain's ties with the EU.

Cabinet ministers arriving at 10 Downing Street in London did not indicate Saturday whether they will back the deal. Cameron has suggested that ministers will be free to reach an independent decision on the prospect of a "Brexit," as Britain leaving the bloc is called.

Justice Secretary Michael Gove has already indicated that he favors leaving the EU a position Cameron called "disappointing." London Mayor Boris Johnson, an influential figure in the Conservative party, has thus far kept his intentions to himself.

The deal agreed by EU leaders also protects Britain from taking part in an "ever closer union" with European nations and makes clear that Britain will not adopt the euro currency shared by 19 EU nations.

Cameron says the deal also protects British interests and restricts future welfare payments to migrants from other EU nations.