Nobel prize-winning economists have been clustered among a small group of prestigious universities.

Nobel prize-winning economists have been clustered among a small group of prestigious universities.

On Monday, Angus Deaton became the sixth economist affiliated with Princeton University to receive a Nobel prize. Deaton was awarded about $975,000 by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for his research into policy responses to poverty and how individual choices shape a broader economy.

Since the Nobel economics prize was first awarded in 1969, the University of Chicago has dominated, producing 12 Nobel-winning economists.

Here's a breakdown of the universities with multiple Nobel prize winners since the economics award was first given in 1969:

Nobel Prize winnersInstitution12University of Chicago6Princeton University5University of California, Berkeley4University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)4Columbia University4Harvard University4Massachusetts Institute of Technology3Yale University2Arizona State University2Carnegie Mellon University2George Mason University2New York University2University of Oslo (Norway)2Stanford University