Editor's note: This story was edited at 2:51 p.m. Aug. 27, 2013, to correct that Adrienne Bartholomew and James Brothers each pleaded guilty to child endangerment and patient endangerment. Involuntary manslaughter and other charges were dismissed. The child's grandmother and main health care provider, Deborah Nelson, pleaded guilty to failing to provide for functionally impaired person.

Editor's note: This story was edited at 2:51 p.m. Aug. 27, 2013, to correct that Adrienne Bartholomew and James Brothers each pleaded guilty to child endangerment and patient endangerment. Involuntary manslaughter and other charges were dismissed. The child’s grandmother and main health care provider, Deborah Nelson, pleaded guilty to failing to provide for functionally impaired person.

SANDUSKY — The family of Isaac Alan Brothers-Bartholomew, who died from malnutrition last year, has pleaded guilty in Erie County Common Pleas Court.

The 18-month-old boy was found dead Nov. 6, 2012, in his crib, at his parent’s home on Risden Road in Vermilion Township. A coroner’s ruling said he died from malnutrition.

His parents, Adrienne Bartholomew, 35, and James Brothers, 33, pleaded guilty to charges of child endangerment and patient endangerment. Involuntary manslaughter and other charges were dismissed.

Both are set to be sentenced in November, according to the court clerk’s office.

The child’s grandmother and main health care provider, Deborah Nelson, pleaded guilty to failing to provide for functionally impaired person. Other charges were dropped. Nelson will be sentenced at a later date in November, according to the clerk’s office.

The couple’s six other children, including a 6-year-old boy who weighed 23 pounds, had been removed from the home by the Erie County Job and Family Services. Four children were treated at Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital for malnutrition. All of those children were underweight.

Bartholomew had told deputies the child had severe acid reflux, gastrointestinal issues and heart murmurs.

One of the couple’s six children told deputies he checked on Isaac after hearing “fussing,” and noticed he was not moving.

It also was learned through medical records that the child had not seen a doctor in eight months at that time, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

Five of the seven children “suffer from various severe physical and mental handicaps that require around-the-clock care,” Bartholomew told deputies.

Erie County Jobs and Family Services received one complaint last year about the Brothers-Bartholomew family before Isaac’s death and two before 2011, but ignored the calls because they didn’t meet criteria for a worker to visit the home, Erie County Jobs and Family Services Director Karen Balconi Ghezzi had said in November 2012.

Hospitals reported the family twice for not attending follow-up medical appointments in 2005 and 2007 in Cuyahoga County, according to a previous story in The Morning Journal.

They were placed under protective supervision, which continued when the family moved to Erie County in 2008. The protective supervision was suspended on Feb. 9, 2009

, the story stated.

On May 3, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services released a copy of its administrative review dealing with the Erie County Department of Job and Family Services and the Brothers-Bartholomew family.

It stated that the department did not comply with Ohio law while workers were involved with the family.

The state DJFS published report had shed little light on the direct interaction among the family, Erie County and Cuyahoga County children services.

Any information, in accordance with state law, identifying specific children is redacted, Benjamin Johnson, deputy director of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services has said. The state officials redacted information about the interactions between the family and Erie County agency on Nov. 6 and 7, immediately after the boy’s death.

The review has prompted the agency to change its policies. The agency made a decision to hire a screening position whose main responsibility will be to be in charge of reports of abuse and neglect, the review stated.