PRODUCTIVITY RISES: U.S. worker productivity accelerated to a 0.9 percent annual pace from April through June after dropping the previous quarter. Productivity measures output per hour of work.

PRODUCTIVITY RISES: U.S. worker productivity accelerated to a 0.9 percent annual pace from April through June after dropping the previous quarter. Productivity measures output per hour of work.

BUT NOT BY MUCH: That's relatively low. In records dating back to 1947, productivity growth averages an annual rate of about 2 percent per year. Weak productivity suggests that companies may have to hire because they can't squeeze more work from their existing employees if demand for their products grows.

LABOR COSTS HEAD HIGHER: Labor costs rose at a 1.4 percent annual pace last quarter after shrinking 4.2 percent from January through March. The modest rise means wages aren't growing fast enough to raise worries about inflation.