The business news enterprise package planned through July 30. For comments or questions, call Joseph Pisani at 212-621-1975. For questions about photos, call ext. 1900. For questions about graphics, call ext. 7636. Repeats of stories are available from http://apexchange.com or the Service Desk, 1-800-838-4616.

The business news enterprise package planned through July 30. For comments or questions, call Joseph Pisani at 212-621-1975. For questions about photos, call ext. 1900. For questions about graphics, call ext. 7636. Repeats of stories are available from http://apexchange.com or the Service Desk, 1-800-838-4616.

Eds: Adds WALL STREET WEEK AHEAD; HEDGE FUND-FALLEN STARS; IRAQ-RISKY BUSINESS.

WALL STREET WEEK AHEAD

NEW YORK Just over half of the companies in the S&P 500 have reported earnings, and some are faring better than others. So far, banks have been the standouts. The materials sector, including miners and chemical companies, has fared the worst. Earnings are also contracting in the technology industry, with some of the older tech companies seeing profits slide as they struggle to adapt to a changing environment. By Business Writer Steve Rothwell.

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HEDGE FUND-FALLEN STARS

NEW YORK Hedge funds were once the rock stars of the financial industry. The smartest people worked for them. The wealthiest gave them their money. They were an easy path to fortune. But if that get-rich-quick narrative was an exaggeration before the financial crisis, it's even less true since. The hedge fund industry's performance has been spotty in recent years; its public image, bruised. SAC Capital Advisors became the latest high-flyer brought low when the Justice Department on Thursday accused it of allowing insider trading and making hundreds of millions of dollars illegally. By Business Writer Christina Rexrode.

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AP photo.

NETFLIX-WAR ROOM

LOS GATOS, Calif. Netflix's Internet video subscription service works around the clock, but it's unusual for more than two dozen of the company's engineers and top managers to be huddled on a midsummer Wednesday evening. This is a special occasion. It's near the end of a grueling day that will culminate in the premiere of "Orange Is The New Black," the fourth exclusive Netflix series to be released in five months. Netflix Inc. invited The Associated Press for an unprecedented glimpse at the technical preparations that go into the release of its original programming. The shows have become the foundation of Netflix's push to build an Internet counterpart to HBO's premium cable channel. By Technology Writer Michael Liedtke.

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AP photos.

HEALTH OVERHAUL-SELLING THE ACA

CHICAGO It will make you stronger. It will give you peace of mind and make you feel like a winner. Health insurance is what the whole country has been talking about, so don't be left out. Sound like a sales pitch? Get ready for a lot more. As President Barack Obama's health care law moves from theory to reality in the coming months, its success may hinge on whether the best minds in advertising can reach one of the hardest-to-find parts of the population: people without health coverage. By Medical Writer Carla K. Johnson.

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AP photos.

SODA DECLINE

NEW YORK It seems that not even Beyonce or new, lower-calorie options can convince Americans to drink more soda. Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and Dr Pepper Snapple all sold less soda in the second quarter in North America, dashing hopes for the moment that splashy new marketing and different sweetener mixes could get drinkers back. By Food Industry Writer Candice Choi.

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AP photos.

FILM-SUMMER STUMBLES

NEW YORK On and off screen, it's been a bruising summer for Hollywood. Every weekend, the multiplex has been under siege like it has rarely been before. As the studios have focused increasingly on the fortunes of monstrously-sized tentpoles, weekend real-estate in the summer months has become precious, fraught territory, leading to extravagant failures like "The Lone Ranger" and "R.I.P.D." and unlikely genre successes. By Entertainment Writer Jake Coyle.

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AP photos.

NSA SURVEILLANCE-CHANGING HABITS

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances. In California, a college student encrypts chats and emails, saying he's not planning anything sinister but shouldn't have to sweat snoopers. News of the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs that targeted phone records but also emails and information transmitted on the Internet has done more than spark a debate about privacy. Some are reviewing and changing their online habits as they consider: How much should I share and how should I share it? By Oskar Garcia.

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AP photos.

IRAQ-RISKY BUSINESS

BAGHDAD Sunni truck driver Obeid Manaa long brought international shipments to Baghdad but now won't go near the Iraqi capital for fear of Shiite threats, instead transferring shipments to Shiite drivers to complete the journey. Spiraling sectarian violence is endangering Iraq's struggling economy, with customers reluctant to spend and the mayhem forcing costly changes to the way business is done. By Sinan Salaheddin.

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AP photos.

COLUMNS:

DIGITAL LIFE-TECH TEST-GOOGLE NEXUS 7 TABLET

NEW YORK When it comes to technology, we've been trained to expect more for less. Devices get more powerful each year, as prices stay the same or drop. With the new Nexus 7 tablet, Google is counting on people willing to pay more for more. The new tablet comes with a $30 price increase over last year's model, but it's still a bargain. The display is sharper and the sound is richer than the old model. There's now a rear camera for taking snapshots. It's a fine complement to your smartphone if it's running Google's Android operating system. By Technology Writer Anick Jesdanun.

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OF MUTUAL INTEREST-EMERGING-MARKETS FUNDS

Not all emerging-market stocks are the same. A wide menu is available, from copper miners in Latin America to natural-gas giants in Russia to casinos in Cambodia. Unfortunately for investors in emerging-market index mutual funds and exchange-traded funds, some managers say the menu is tilted toward the stocks that are less desirable. That's one reason investors have been turning to actively managed mutual funds this summer. By Stan Choe.

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SMALLBIZ-SMALL TALK

NEW YORK Wells Fargo certainly doesn't have to beg small business owners to come in and apply for credit. The bank is already one of the country's biggest lenders to small businesses. Over the past 10 years, it has made $8.5 billion in Small Business Administration-backed loans. That's more than any other bank. Still, Lisa Stevens, head of small business banking, spends time with small business owners each week to learn about their concerns and struggles. Overwhelmingly, she finds that they need guidance so she pushes her bankers to provide help that goes beyond opening checking accounts and approving loans. By Business Writer Joyce M. Rosenberg.

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AP photo.

Eds: This is the second installment in a series of Q&As with small business bankers at big banks.

With:

SMALLBIZ-STEVENS BIO BOX

OF MUTUAL INTEREST-EMERGING-MARKETS FUNDS

Not all emerging-market stocks are the same. Investors have a wide menu available, from copper miners in Latin America to natural-gas giants in Russia to small casino operators in Cambodia. Unfortunately for investors, the kinds of stocks that mutual-fund managers say are the most attractive can also be the most difficult to find. By Stan Choe.

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DIGITAL LIFE-TECH TEST-FREQUENT PHONE UPGRADES

NEW YORK Over the past few weeks, three major U.S. wireless providers unveiled plans to combat phone envy: Say you just bought a phone, but one with better features comes out a month later. You no longer have to wait a full two years to get it. You pay a hefty monthly fee instead. The phone companies call them installment plans, think of them as phone rental. All three are optional, so you can still buy phones the old way. Here's a closer look at the three plans to see what's right for you. By Technology Writer Anick Jesdanun.

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ON THE MONEY-HEALTH CARE OVERSEAS

More Americans travel overseas in July than any other month; to popular destinations including Europe, the Caribbean and Asia. Such trips usually involve months of preparations, but even the most carefully planned itinerary can be thrown off course by an unexpected health problem. Here's a look at how to find the best medical care, and pay for it, while traveling overseas. By Matthew Perrone.

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