Even if you're not headed back to school, fall is a good time to brush up on professional skills and learn a thing or two.

Even if you're not headed back to school, fall is a good time to brush up on professional skills and learn a thing or two. The US Small Business Administration is teaming with Fifth Third Bank and the Destiny Center in a free Ask the Expert luncheon and panel discussion on Sept. 9. Part of a monthly series, this one explores certifications and procurement. Register online.

Learn Donatos' Chairwoman Jane Grote Abell's secrets for success in an Idea Factory presentation sponsored by the Ohio Restaurant Association Sept. 7 at Red Brick Occasions. Grote Abell shares her 4 Cs to Success and Casey Minton of KCM Insights Consulting will discuss consumer and marketplace trends. The event is free to restaurant association members and $25 for others.

Education is important to good health as well as to a good job. That's the premise of a seminar presented by the Health Policy Institute of Ohio on Sept. 15. The session at OCLC in Dublin, State Policymaking at the Intersection of Education and Health, will look at ways to improve state health policy while also supporting education goals. Continuing legal education credits are requested. Register online by Sept. 8.

The arts can also provide a pathway to well-being. The 2016 Arts and Autism Conference: Creating, Learning, Living explores the intersection of arts and autism on Sept. 20 at the Columbus Museum of Art. Design Group President Michael Bongiornokeynotes.

Another proven route to improved well-being in the workplace is through engaging employees in opportunities to give back. Matthew Goldstein and his social enterprise, Besa, know that well. Besa won a $50,000 SEA Change grant on Friday to help take its software platform for measuring the impact of corporate philanthropy programs to even more companies.

If you're looking for a way to give back outside of your workplace, apply by Friday to be part of the City of Columbus' Charter Review Commission. Columbus residents who are not elected officials or city employees are eligible to serve. Mayor Andrew Ginther and Columbus City Council will select commission members to help identify how to improve the structure of city government.