Five Ohio State industrial design current students and graduates saw their first invention meet its fundraising goal of $25,000 on Kickstarter

Last night, five Ohio State industrial design current students and graduates saw their first invention meet its fundraising goal of $25,000 on Kickstarter within 11 days of launch.

The product is the Titan mixer bottle, a $25 no-shake bottle that mixes liquids and powders by a plunger, which one of its inventors, Adan Ali, claims to be more efficient than shaking.

The five students are Ali, Gered Bowman, Fred Bowman, Mohamed Rage and Lonie Smith. Theycreated the Titan under the company name 5ID, with "ID" standing for industrial designers, and hit relatively quick success considering that their idea for the fitness accessory came to team member Fred Bowman in May 2014.

5ID is estimated to hit even more gold. According to Ali, Kicktraq, a projector of Kickstarter startups' success, has estimated that Titan will raise up to $120,000.

But the team could have gained the support to propel their idea to a realization through OSU's Technology Commercialization Office (TCO). So why did they go it alone?

"We just wanted to create something independently," says Ali, "and it is mostly students from business, Fisher students, who use TCO."

Although Ali noted that he was not aware of many other industrial design students who developed their own product while in school, some of his own classmates were also the exception when they created a startup company called Juiceboxx, which manufactures protectors for MacBook chargers, and used Kickstarter as well.

According to 5ID's faculty advisor, Dr. Noel Mayo, working with TCO instead of Kickstarter would have involved handing over rights to OSU.

Though 5ID did not go to TCO for aid in development, support for their product came from the buckeye community. A launch party on Friday, May 22 at the Ohio Union welcomed family, friends and faculty to celebrate the product's start and raise approximately $2,000 of the current Kickstarter raised amount.

Ali says all five team members are surprised at their achievements so far, but for the five, Ali says it could not have become a reality without the help of 5ID's faculty advisor, Mayo.

"He's been supportive from the jump and critiques us when needed," says Ali.

"I try to teach ahead of what I was taught," says Mayo. "I encourage [my students] to go beyond what most people accept to be good."

-Julie France