One boy didn't get his Advent calendar on time. Someone else was missing a medication delivery. The service they all relied on seemed to be failing them, and the residents of Bexley and Eastmoor wanted to know why. "People are just surprised," said Bexley Mayor Ben Kessler, whose own mailbox sat empty for days.

One boy didn’t get his Advent calendar on time. Someone else was missing a medication delivery. The service they all relied on seemed to be failing them, and the residents of Bexley and Eastmoor wanted to know why.

“People are just surprised,” said Bexley Mayor Ben Kessler, whose own mailbox sat empty for days.

After Kessler brought the issue to the U.S. Postal Service this week, it began an investigation to see whether there was a problem, said spokesman David Van Allen.

Van Allen couldn’t provide specifics on the probe, but he said it won’t take long.

“If there is an issue, it will be resolved,” he said. “It will go quickly.”

Kessler said residents of Bexley and the Eastmoor neighborhood of Columbus took to Facebook when they realized their mail wasn’t arriving when it should.

Eastmoor resident Melissa Bedolla — whose mail sometimes arrives in the morning, sometimes at night and sometimes with her neighbor’s magazines — got more than 100 replies when she asked whether anyone else in the 43209 ZIP code had been missing mail lately.

“This has been going on for over a year,” said one reply. “A baby invitation (was) two months late! The shower was over!!”

On Monday night, residents began messaging Kessler, too. He went outside to check his own mail. Nothing there. It occurred to him that he hadn’t gotten anything over the weekend.

“I’m usually not that excited about mail because of bills and such,” he said. “I’m maybe not that observant.”

But Kessler met with a local post-office representative yesterday, and maybe that helped. He got an investigation started, and later that day, his wife told him the mail finally showed up at home.

lkurtzman@dispatch.com

@LoriKurtzman