The New York Times News Service will move the following business features and commentary for release Sunday, March 2. If you have questions about stories, call 888-346-9867 or 212-556-1927. For questions about photos, call 888-603-1036 or 212-556-4204. To reach the New York Times News Service, phone 888-346-9867 or 212-556-1927. You can also follow the News Service on Twitter: @NYTNewsService.

The New York Times News Service will move the following business features and commentary for release Sunday, March 2. If you have questions about stories, call 888-346-9867 or 212-556-1927. For questions about photos, call 888-603-1036 or 212-556-4204. To reach the New York Times News Service, phone 888-346-9867 or 212-556-1927. You can also follow the News Service on Twitter: @NYTNewsService.

On the Cover

TECH-HEADQUARTERS (Undated) — Tech’s giants, including Facebook, Twitter and Google, have built and continue to expand headquarters that are not just workplaces, but also architectural representations of their company cultures. The spaces are distinctive, as companies seek to build a consumer profile and maybe even lasting loyalty. By Quentin Hardy.

With photos XNYT65-74.

HOTEL-SQUABBLE (Undated) — A squabble over Claridge’s, the grande dame of luxury London hotels, is part of the legacy of Ireland’s economic bust, which left property tycoons vulnerable to takeover when real estate values plunged and loans were called due. But it also is a saga of business warfare waged around the globe with a cameo role for Tony Blair, the former British prime minister, who intervened to try to broker a deal. By Doreen Carvajal and Stephen Castle.

With photos XNYT46, 47.

MORGENSON-COLUMN (Undated) — JPMorgan Chase is trying to block a shareholder’s proposal from going to a vote. Weekly Wall Street commentary. By Gretchen Morgenson.

Commentary

ECON-VIEW (Undated) — Bitcoin’s future is very much in doubt. Yet whatever becomes of it, something good can arise from its innovations, even if the results are very different from its current form or its numerous competitors. By Robert J. Shiller.

Features

ROLLING-ROBOTS (Undated) — A few years ago, the introduction of remote-controlled robots on wheels brought a new dimension to Internet video chats, keeping the conversation going as people moved from room to room. But their costliness has made them a rarity in real life. Now that is changing, and the robots are becoming inexpensive enough that they may soon have many practical uses. By Anne Eisenberg.

With photos XNYT44, 45.

OPTIMISM-DOWNTURNS (Undated) — A counterintuitive finding — that positive visions of the future precede and may even prompt economic downturns — appears to be the case both for people and the economy as a whole. That’s the finding of new research that calls into question assumptions about the value of unbridled optimism. By Matt Richtel.

With photo.

OPEN-WORKSPACES (Undated) — Open-plan offices are good for several things: saving money, flexibility, collaboration. But they are also hard on our ears — not because they are loud but because they are so very quiet. By Phyllis Korkki.

With photo.

Investing

INVEST-FEES (Undated) — A publication for investors from the Securities and Exchange Commission offers a stark reminder of the impact that fees can have on returns. By Jeff Sommer.

Autos

AUTOS-RANGE-ROVER (Undated) — Christopher Jensen reviews the 2014 Range Rover Sport, a more spirited version of the basic model.

With photos XNYT35, 36.

AUTOS-1960-MARK-V (Philadelphia) — Look at a new car that you think is preposterous. Chances are good that, 50 years from now, it will attract a crowd of admirers on the street. Such is the case with Chris Rossi’s 1960 Lincoln Continental Mark V, which redefined the boundaries of excess at a time when behemoth cars were the norm. By Benjamin Preston.

AUTOS-LOST-STUDEBAKER (Undated) — I really did lose a car, and it stayed lost for more than 15 years. It wasn’t just any car, but a 1963 Studebaker Avanti, and a rather desirable supercharged 4-speed example at that. By Dave Kinney.

With photo XNYT37-39.

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