BEAVERCREEK - The long legal battle over an EPA Superfund site here seems to be moving toward resolution as federal officials announce public hearings on final clean up plans.

BEAVERCREEK — The long legal battle over an EPA Superfund site here seems to be moving toward resolution as federal officials announce public hearings on final clean up plans.

In January, the US District Court Southern Division issued a consent degree by which some 37 companies, including Ford, GM and 3M, among others, agree to pay for the clean up of the site.

Costs are expected to total $13 million for the two-acre site at 3990 East Patterson Road, which was used as a chemical recycling facility until is was destroyed by fire in 1969.

The public can comment on EPA plans for the Lammers Barrel Site via the EPA's web page on the case until March 12.

The Lammers Barrel site, formerly known as the Kohnen and Lammers Chemical Company, operated from 1953 until the 1969 fire; the company bought, sold and reclaimed all types of solvents.

The company filed bankruptcy following the fire.

The site contaminants include chemicals that are hazardous to both humans and the environment.

“It's great that (the parties) have agreed and they can move forward,” said City Engineer Jeff Moorman said.

No date has yet been set for the final clean up to begin but the city is “hoping for sooner instead of later,” he said.

Throughout this process, Beavercreek has primarily “tried to facilitate communication between the public and the EPA.”

In the mid-1980s, the Ohio EPA sampled residential wells throughout Beavercreek. Based on these sampling results and additional investigations that followed, Ohio EPA and EPA said it removed the known threats to public health and the environment between 1985 and 2003.

County water lines were extended to several homes in 1999, and equipment was installed to pump contaminated water from the ground and contaminated vapors from the soil, and the decision to conduct a more extensive, long-term investigation to assess cleanup options, according to EPA documents.

In 2002, EPA began overseeing a long-term remedial investigation to determine whether chemicals at the site pose any risk to people or the environment.

Under EPA supervision, 39 ground water monitoring wells were installed and 29 soil samples were collected. Surface water and sediment samples were also collected from five locations along Little Beaver Creek.

In 2010 feasibility study was conducted to examine and compare various cleanup methods in terms of their effectiveness, cost, technology, ease or difficulty of implementation, whether the options meet federal and state regulations, and other criteria.

In October 2009, EPA conducted interviews with local residents and elected officials in October 2009 and participated in a City Council meeting in January 2010, in preparation for compiling this revised CIP and to update people on the status of site activities.

EPA also issued a question-and-answer fact sheet in April 2010 that provided answers to questions residents asked during the community interviews.

Those documents are available at the Beavercreek Library.

During the public comment period, the proposed Consent Decree can be examined and downloaded at this Justice Department web site: www.usdoj.gov/enrd/Consent_Decrees.html.