The business news enterprise package planned through July 2. For comments or questions, call Joseph Pisani at 212-621-1975. For questions about photos, call ext. 1900. For questions about graphics, call ext. 7636. Repeats of stories are available from http://apexchange.com or the Service Desk, 1-800-838-4616.

The business news enterprise package planned through July 2. For comments or questions, call Joseph Pisani at 212-621-1975. For questions about photos, call ext. 1900. For questions about graphics, call ext. 7636. Repeats of stories are available from http://apexchange.com or the Service Desk, 1-800-838-4616.

Eds: Adds WALL STREET WEEK AHEAD; ALLEGIANT AIR; CHINA-CREDIT CRUNCH; AUSTRALIA-SEX WORKERS.

WALL STREET WEEK AHEAD

NEW YORK The stock market finished the first half of the year with its strongest return in a decade It was an impressive performance in some ways. The Standard & Poor's index rose over the six months and hit an all-time high on May 21. Stocks surged as the housing market healed, companies earned record profits and the economy grew thanks in part to ultra-low interest rates. But if history is any guide, it could be a tough act to follow. By Steve Rothwell.

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AP IMPACT: THE GREAT RESET-HIGHER EDUCATION

CHONGQING, China Determined to learn their way out of the Great Recession, unprecedented millions of people have enrolled in colleges and universities around the world in the past five years. What they're finding is an educational landscape turning upside down. In the United States where top schools have long championed a liberal style of learning and broad education before specialization higher education's focus is shifting to getting students that first job in a still-shaky economy. Elsewhere in the world, there is a growing emphasis on broader learning as an economic necessity. Advocates hear employers demanding the "soft skills" communication, critical thinking, and working with diverse groups that broad-based learning more effectively instills. They want to graduate job-creators, not just job-fillers. By Justin Pope and Didi Tang.

AP photos.

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GREAT RESET-WHAT EMPLOYERS WANT - They can get good grades, earn a diploma and breeze through that campus rite of spring, the job interview. But college graduates still might not land a decent job. The world's top employers are pickier than ever. They want to see more than high marks and the right degree. They want graduates with so-called soft skills those who can work well in teams, write and speak with clarity, adapt quickly to changes in technology and business conditions and interact with colleagues from different countries and cultures. By Business Writer Paul Wiseman.

AP photos.

GREAT RESET-CHANGES More urgent. More crowded. More expensive. But also more flexible and accessible to millions. That is how higher education has changed around the world in the wake of the global financial crisis that struck five years ago. A look at four trends whose origins predate the Great Recession, but have been unmistakably fueled by it. By Education Writer Justin Pope.

AP photos.

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AP video: A look at college students in co-op programs that increase their chances of getting a job after graduation.

AP photos: A look at surprising contrasts and changes in educational environments worldwide. From students playing the guitar in a communist Chinese university to Americans students learning how to work in a factory.

AP interactive: A data visualization showing college enrollment trends globally and unemployment and income by field of study.

ALLEGIANT AIR

LAS VEGAS While other U.S. airlines have struggled with the ups and downs of the economy and oil prices, tiny Allegiant Air has been profitable for 10 straight years. Its planes are old and the seats don't recline. It grounds nearly its entire fleet on Tuesdays, the least busy travel day. And there is a fee for almost every service and amenity imaginable, including using the Internet or a credit card to book a flight. But the company succeeds by offering nonstop flights from small towns to sunny vacation spots and then aggressively marketing deals on hotels, rental cars, show tickets and other entertainment to passengers. Last year, U.S. airlines earned an average of 37 cents per passenger; Allegiant made a whopping $11.22. By Scott Mayerowitz.

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AP photos.

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ALLEGIANT AIR-FEES A look at all of the airline's fees.

ALLEGIANT AIR-ROUTES The cities that Allegiant flies to.

DELTA-CEO INTERVIEW

NEW YORK Delta Air Lines is on track for its fourth straight annual profit. Its passengers file fewer complaints about lost bags and late flights than those flying its chief rivals. Its merger with Northwest is considered a blueprint for combining airlines. But CEO Richard Anderson says he isn't the only one with the answers. "The senior management team hunts as a pack," he says. By Airlines Writer Joshua Freed.

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AP photos.

CODING CAMPS

ATLANTA The video game Jacob Asofsky is creating is simple: "Someone who is trying to take over the world and you try to stop them." The 12-year-old from Florida is spending two weeks at a summer camp here in a program that teaches programming skills to young people. So-called coding camps for children are becoming more popular amid a growing effort to expand access to computer programming and inspire more youths to seek computer science degrees and careers in technology. Their rise underscores a seeming mismatch in the U.S. economy: people like Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Tumblr founder David Karp illustrate the opportunities programming chops can create, yet universities are not graduating enough coding savvy students to meet employers' demands. By Christina Almeida Cassidy.

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AP photos, video.

FILM-FIFTY DOLLAR MOVIE

NEW YORK So this was the deal: For $50, you got to see Brad Pitt's hotly anticipated zombie thriller "World War Z" before all your friends. You also got 3D glasses to keep, popcorn and sodas, a poster and the DVD when it comes out. Hundreds of fans did pay $50 in a small-scale marketing experiment in five theaters and the studio, Paramount Pictures, says it worked well. With all the recent talk about future movie ticket prices climbing into the stratosphere, is it a harbinger of things to come? By Jocelyn Noveck.

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AP photos.

POT PIGS

SNOHOMISH, Wash. The white van with tinted windows pulled up to the driveway with its cargo - cardboard boxes full of marijuana. And the customers eagerly awaited it, grunting and snorting. The deal was going down for three hungry Berkshire pigs from a Washington state farm, and a German television crew was there to film it. Part flavor experiment, part green recycling, part promotion and bolstered by the legalization of recreational marijuana in Washington state, pot excess has been fed to the hogs by their owners, pig farmer Jeremy Gross and Seattle butcher William von Schneidau, since earlier this year. Gross and von Schneidau now sell their "pot pig" cuts at von Schneidau's butcher shop in Seattle's Pike Place Market at a premium price bacon is $17 a pound while chops go for $16.90 a pound. By Manuel Valdes.

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AP photos.

CHINA-CREDIT CRUNCH

BEIJING Like a boxer slimming down for a fight, Li Zhongjian is shrinking his 20-year-old business manufacturing cigarette lighters to brace for a credit crunch he sees looming over China's entrepreneurs. Li's workforce in the southeastern city of Wenzhou has shrunk by half to 300 this year and he isn't replacing employees who leave. He said he used to borrow money but is preparing to do without credit that might no longer be available as regulators try to force Chinese banks to cool a lending boom they worry could race out of control. China will benefit in the long run from a safer financial system, but the short-term cost could be a painful squeeze on entrepreneurs. Some say a recovery that already was faltering could weaken further. By Joe McDonald.

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AP photos.

AUSTRALIA-SEX WORKERS

A lone woman checking into a motel in the Australian mining town of Moranbah can expect some blunt questioning from the owners: "Are you a working girl?" Turning on a heel and storming away indignantly will be taken as an admission to prostitution, a motel owner says. Big-city sex workers are running up against small town values in Outback Australia, a country where prostitution is legal. By Rod McGuirk.

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AP photos.

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SMALLBIZ-SMALL TALK

NEW YORK Robb Hilson's job as head of small business at Bank of America is to convince company owners that the bank does want to do business with them. That's not easy when small businesses have consistently said in surveys that they find it hard to get loans from banks. But in the 18 months Hilson has been on the job, the nation's second-largest bank has had success with its 3.2 million small business customers. Last year, Bank of America made $8.7 billion in new loans to small businesses, up 28 percent from 2011. Hilson talks about his challenges and successes, and his view of how small businesses are doing, in an interview with The Associated Press. By Business Writer Joyce M. Rosenberg.

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SMALLBIZ-HILSON-BIO BOX

OF MUTUAL INTEREST-MID-YEAR SCORECARD

Brace yourselves. Investors in bond mutual funds are likely to feel some pain when they open their mid-year account statements. After years of steady returns, many bond mutual funds have lost money so far in 2013. Some of the sharpest drops have come from those that buy Treasury bonds. It could be a rude awakening for investors lulled into thinking they were among the safest investments. By Stan Choe.

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DIGITAL LIFE-TECH TEST-MICROSOFT-WINDOWS TUNEUP

SAN FRANCISCO Microsoft Corp. CEO Steve Ballmer says the latest update to Windows is a "refined blend" of its older operating system for PCs and its new touch-enabled interface for more modern, mobile devices. After some hands-on time with it, the update seems to me like a patch over an ever-widening chasm. By Business Writer Ryan Nakashima.

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AP photos.

DIGITAL LIFE-TECH TEST-OUYA GAME MACHINE

Ouya promises to deliver the best in inexpensive indie gaming in high resolution, at a cost of just $100. Some of the more satisfying indie releases of the past few years have combined old-school graphics with game play that's more sophisticated than most big-budget console releases offer. Nothing currently on Ouya matches the quality of those games, but if the system can attract that level of talent, it will be a console to be reckoned with. By Lou Kesten.?

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ON THE MONEY-TEENAGE FINANCES

They're old enough to work, but do they know how to manage their money? Experts say parents should emphasize financial literacy during their kids' teenage and early college years. Here are six ways to burnish teens' money-management skills for college and beyond. By Alex Veiga.

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