SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) - When high school football coach Kevin Bella needs an intense, heart-to-heart with a player, he goes home and sits on his couch.

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) When high school football coach Kevin Bella needs an intense, heart-to-heart with a player, he goes home and sits on his couch.

Bella, who is deaf, communicates with a new technology that brings a live sign language interpreter to his television screen. The player, on a phone elsewhere, hears the interpreter give voice to Bella's signs.

Bella is among a rising number of disabled people who are increasingly able to find and keep jobs because of new technologies specifically aimed at helping them better communicate or complete tasks.

The past few years have seen a number of technological breakthroughs targeting disabled consumers, such as screen readers that can synthesize text into speech. These advances have translated into more disabled people being able to land jobs.