A region's retail ecosystem requires many working components to link together if it is to succeed for the businesses operating within its confines, but to accommodate change and growth there is also an outstanding dynamic element-innovation.

A region's retail ecosystem requires many working components to link together if it is to succeed for the businesses operating within its confines, but to accommodate change andgrowth there is also an outstanding dynamic element-innovation.

Innovation is something that Anomatic Corporation has long employed and embraced, proven over the last 50 years by its expanding customer base and development.

The company, which primarily manufactures custom packaging for the beauty and personal care industry, was founded in Chicago in 1965, relocating to central Ohio in 1974. Now headquartered in New Albany, Anomatic serves a customer base that includes Victoria's Secret, Revlon, Estee Lauder, Mary Kay, Walgreens, CVS and Bath & Body Works, among others.

The company is always looking for new opportunity and one of the best ways to open that door is through innovation, says Scott Rusch, president and CEO of Anomatic.

"When you think about a product's shelf appeal, it is all custom packaging based on what a particular brand wants," Rusch says. "To drive business you constantly have to innovate, looking at different textures or colors to make a package more attractive. It has to have eye appeal."

The company, with about 900 employees, also operates out of Newark, Ohio; Naugatuck, Ct.; Paris and Suzhou, China. Its products are made from anodizing, a metal finishing process for treating aluminum and creating a container for everything from lipstick to liquor bottle caps.

Central Ohio's retail ecosystem has much to offer Anomatic, including an abundance of local suppliers, vast amounts of natural resources and competitive utility rates, Rusch says.

"There are key suppliers in the industrial park and you get great synergy from working together and just being able to go next door to work out production issues or problems," he says. "And it's a central location providing easy access to national customers. Ohio also has a very rich history in manufacturing, so there are skilled people available for hire."

The company uses a process to coat plastic to make it appear to be metal, a component of their business that has proven so successful Anomatic recently doubled the size of a production facility in New Albany, Rusch says.

Another great advantage in the Columbus Region, especially for retail, is the ability to get a product out quickly and efficiently to the market. And a focus on this area can aid in the success of a retail business, he says.

"It really is about speed to market and speed of replacements with a short lead time that helps you succeed," Rusch says. "In our view the companies that do well today and in the future have spent a lot of time working on supply time in order to cut the time to market."

And local business-oriented organizations like Columbus 2020 earn high marks for responding to the needs of companies in the retail ecosystem chain, he says.

"When we decided to build a new facility in New Albany in 2011, Columbus 2020 was very helpful in bringing together all the people we needed to talk to from an infrastructure point of view," Rusch says. "They introduced us to good contractors to pull the pieces together quickly and Rucilli built this in six months."

Last, but not least, because of location, it's less expensive for Anomatic to ship its products, Rusch says.

"And it's good for the environment because you are not shipping things for thousands of miles," he says.