The research team at Columbus 2020 is forecasting a bright 2015 in terms of national economic stability, low energy costs, and Columbus regional growth and diversification.

The research team at Columbus 2020 is forecasting a bright 2015 in terms of national economic stability, low energy costs, and Columbus regional growth and diversification.

"The American workforce and the productivity that we continue to have is extraordinary relative to the rest of the world," says Kenny McDonald, chief economic officer of Columbus 2020.

Though fuel prices decreased dramatically during the last quarter of 2014, McDonald says the nation's energy advantage still remains strong.

"First nationally, then we (also) have some very unique regional advantages with what's happening with the shale gas" across Ohio, says McDonald. Logistically, Ohio is positioned to access low-cost energy from Canada, from which the state imported $6.5 billion in crude petroleum in 2014; crude is Ohio's leading import from our neighbor to the north, according to the Canadian consulate.

The Columbus Region will continue its growth as a "global logistics hub, with both e-commerce and air freight coming in and out of our region every day," says McDonald. Columbus' proximity to high-value markets in Canada and the Eastern U.S. will continue to bolster the regional economy in 2015, as will the region's diverse strengths.

"We're an automotive region. We have Honda and all their suppliers," says McDonald. "We're a burgeoning technology hub with great companies in a lot of different fields that are using technology to draw things forward."

That diversity, relatively low cost of living and access to a young, skilled workforce will continue to make Columbus a "great headquarters city" in 2015, McDonald adds.